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 From the Well4Life Blog 
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What Conditions Do We Treat at AtlantiCare Neurosciences Institute?

We treat everything from the most common to the most critical neurological diseases and disorders. And, when you combine our advanced technology with a highly-skilled and focused neurology team, you get comprehensive, quality care – its healthcare you can believe in.

We treat neurological and neurosurgical conditions A-Z. They include:

A

B-C

D-G

 

H-M

N-R

S-Z

 

A

  • Alzheimer’s disease: A type of dementia that causes problems with memory, behavior and thinking.
  • Anterior Horn Disease: Any of a group of diseases that affect the anterior horn cells which make up part of the spinal cord.
  • Arteriovenous fistulas: These are an abnormal connection between an artery and a vein. Normally, blood flows from your arteries to your capillaries to your veins. Nutrients and oxygen in your blood travel from your capillaries to tissues in your body. With an arteriovenous fistula, blood flows directly from an artery into a vein, bypassing some capillaries. When this happens, tissues below the bypassed capillaries receive a diminished blood supply.
  • Arteriovenous malformations:  These are defects in the vascular system: arteries, veins and capillaries. An AVM is a snarled tangle of arteries and veins. They are connected to each other, with no capillaries. That interferes with the blood circulation in an organ. AVMs can happen anywhere, but they are more common in the brain or spinal cord.
  • Ataxia: A lack of muscle control during voluntary movements, such as walking or picking up objects. 
  • Autonomic Disorders: Problems related to the autonomic nervous system.

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B-C

  • Back and spine disorders. These include, but are not limited to: degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, spinal infections, spinal tumors, spondyloosisthesis, disc replacement, scoliosis and more. 
  • Bell’s Palsy: A paralysis or weakness of the muscles on one side of the face.
  • Brachial Plexus Palsy: When nerves in the brachial plexus get damaged, signals cannot travel like usual from the brain to the arm muscles. 
  • Brain tumor and nervous system cancer. Abnormal masses of tissue that can be benign or cancerous.
  • Carotid artery disease: This is a disease in which a waxy substance called plaque (plak) builds up inside the carotid arteries. You have two common carotid arteries, one on each side of the neck.
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A hand and arm condition that causes numbness, tingling and other symptoms.
  • Cerebral aneurysms: Also called an intracranial aneurysm or brain aneurysm, these are bulging, weakened areas in the wall of an artery in the brain, resulting in an abnormal widening, ballooning, or bleb. Because there is a weakened spot in the aneurysm wall, there is a risk for rupture (bursting) of the aneurysm.
  • Cerebral Artery Thrombosis: A leading cause of strokes.
  • Cerebral Palsy: A group of permanent movement disorders that appear in early childhood.
  • Chiari’s Deformity: Structural defects in the cerebellum.
  • Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuritis: A neurological disorder characterized by progressive weakness and impaired sensory function in the legs and arms.
  • Concussions: A traumatic brain injury that alters the way your brain functions. Effects are usually temporary.
  • Convulsions: A medical condition where body muscles contract and relax rapidly and repeatedly, resulting in an uncontrolled shaking of the body.
  • Corticobasal Degeneration: A rare, progressive neurodegenerative disease involving the cerebral cortex and the basal ganglia.

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D-G

  • Dementia: This describes a group of symptoms affecting memory, thinking and social abilities severely enough to interfere with daily functioning.
  • Diplopia: Commonly known as double vision.
  • Dystonia: Painful, prolonged muscle contractions that cause involuntary repetitive twisting and sustained muscle contractions. 
  • Encephalopathy: A general term describing a disease that affects the function or structure of your brain. There are many types of encephalopathy and brain disease
  • Essential Tremor: A nervous system disorder that causes rhythmic shaking.
  • Gait Abnormality: A deviation from normal walking.
  • Giant Cell Arteritis: An inflammation of the lining of the arteries.

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H-M

  • Headache/migraines: Migraines are painful headaches usually accompanied by nausea, vomiting and light sensitivity.
  • Huntington’s Disease: An inherited disease that causes the progressive breakdown (degeneration) of nerve cells in the brain.
  • Insomnia: A sleep disorder.
  • Invertebral Disc Degeneration: Progressive structural failure of the discs.
  • Labyrinthitis: Irritation and swelling of the inner ear.
  • Lyme Disease: A bacterial infection transmitted by ticks.
  • Meningitis: An inflammation of the membranes (meninges) surrounding your brain and spinal cord.
  • Multiple sclerosis: An unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body.
  • Myasthenic Syndromes: An inherited neuromuscular disorder caused by defects of several types at the neuromuscular junction.

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N-R

  • Narcolepsy: A chronic neurological disorder involving the loss of the brain's ability to normally regulate sleep-wake cycles.
  • Neuromuscular disorders: Neuromuscular diseases are rare, acquired or inherited (genetic) conditions that affect some part of the neuromuscular system and are progressive in nature and result in muscle weakness or fatigue.
  • Neuropathy: Problems with the peripheral nerves.  
  • Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A potentially serious sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts during sleep.
  • Parkinson’s disease: A progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement.
  • Restless legs syndrome: Uncomfortable sensations in the legs (and sometimes arms or other parts of the body) and an irresistible urge to move the legs to relieve the sensations.

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S-Z

  • Sciatica: Pain that radiates along the path of the sciatic nerve, which branches from the lower back through hips, buttocks and down each leg.
  • Seizures/Epilepsy: These occur when there is a change in the brain’s electrical activity. They can cause dramatic, noticeable symptoms or no symptoms at all. The symptoms of a severe seizure are often widely recognized by violent shaking and loss of control. 
  • Stroke/TIA: A stroke occurs when the blood supply to part of your brain is interrupted or severely reduced, depriving your brain tissue of oxygen and nutrients. There are two types of strokes. They are: Ischemic (the most common cause) and occur when a brain artery is blocked, resulting in an insufficient supply of blood to part of the brain; and hemorrhagic which is a rupture of a brain artery.
  • Traumatic brain injuries: Complex injuries with a broad spectrum of symptoms and disabilities. 

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